ASK A NATURAL GAS KEYNOTE SPEAKER AND FUTURIST: WHAT’S THE FUTURE OF ENERGY?

ASK A NATURAL GAS KEYNOTE SPEAKER AND FUTURIST: WHAT’S THE FUTURE OF ENERGY?

What precisely do natural gas keynote speakers find themselves being asked to chat about with meeting and event audiences? A range of topics from AI to automation and the future of work it turns out as they strive to help businesses adapt to business uncertainty and disruption.

That said, for those new to the field, we should start at the very beginning. Notably, it helps to know what types of goods that natural gas keynote speakers present on, and types of firms they often partner with to start. You’ll find answers waiting below.

  • Methane – The main component of natural gas. Methane is a light hydrocarbon that is colorless and odorless in its pure form.
  • Ethane – The second-largest component of natural gas. Ethane is used as feedstock for ethylene production or so natural gas keynote speakers can explain.
  • Propane – A heavier natural gas liquid with a variety of applications, including heating, cooking, and engine fuel.
  • Butane – The heaviest natural gas liquid with uses similar to propane.
  • Pentanes – Heavy hydrocarbons that are liquid at room temperature and pressure. Like natural gas keynote speakers would tell you, you’ll find them¬† blended into gasoline.
  • Natural Gas Liquids (NGLs) – A mixture of ethane, propane, butane, pentanes, and even heavier hydrocarbons that can be extracted from natural gas. NGLs are very valuable.
  • Shale Gas – Trapped within shale rock formations. Fracking technology is used to extract it, as you might hear natural gas keynote speakers mention.
  • Coalbed Methane – Extracted from coal beds.
  • Tight Gas – Natural gas contained in reservoirs with low permeability like shale or tight sandstone. Horizontal drilling and fracking enable tight gas extraction.
  • Sour Gas – Natural gas containing high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide that needs to be processed to meet pipeline standards.
  • Biogas – Methane produced from the decomposition of organic wastes and burned as an energy source, as natural gas keynote speakers can confirm.

 

Firms dealing in each of these offerings tend to bring in thought leaders for meetings, conferences, conventions and events. And while methane makes up over 90% of natural gas, it also contains other hydrocarbon components and can be classified based on source and composition.